The Office of Science and Tech Policy, and More from CRS

The Congressional Research Service, which does not make its publications directly available to the public, has recently issued or updated several noteworthy reports.  The following CRS reports obtained by Secrecy News have not previously been made available online (all pdf).

“The President’s Office of Science and Technology Policy: Issues for Congress,” November 10, 2008 (40 pages).

“Human Rights in China: Trends and Policy Implications,” October 31, 2008 (38 pages).

“Privacy: An Overview of Federal Statutes Governing Wiretapping and Electronic Eavesdropping,” updated September 2, 2008 (164 pages).

“Privacy: An Abbreviated Outline of Federal Statutes Governing Wiretapping and Electronic Eavesdropping,” updated September 2, 2008 (6 pages).

“North Korea: Terrorism List Removal?,” updated November 6, 2008 (36 pages).

“Statutory Interpretation: General Principles and Recent Trends,” updated August 31, 2008 (55 pages).

No Responses to “The Office of Science and Tech Policy, and More from CRS”

  1. KF Groves November 13, 2008 at 4:22 PM #

    I have it in my brain that CRS was going change its policy against direct release to the public, and that I received that impression in a post on Secret Steve news – am I wrong, or did something change?

    I assume there is a policy in place at CRS against identifying the rationale behind what subjects are written about, again presumably including the identity of persons instigating interest in particular subjects. Right or wrong on that, is there a statement of such policy available?

    The reason I raise these questions now in particular is the coincidence of timing with these particular subjects and the ongoing executive transition process [I realize you’re much too …polite?…to note that such a possibility occurred to you.

  2. Steven Aftergood November 13, 2008 at 5:28 PM #

    CRS management says that it cannot (and does not want to) change the current non-disclosure policy unless and until Congress directs it to do so. Congress has shown little interest in the possibility so far. CRS defended its position in this April 2007 memorandum (pdf). The issue is not so much who requested a particular report, but whether any reports at all will be publicly disseminated. Specific research projects that are undertaken by CRS for a particular member of Congress are rarely disclosed anyway, unless the member chooses to do so. As you suggest, the CRS (non-)disclosure policy is one more item that is ripe for reconsideration as we move towards a new administration and a new Congress.

Leave a Reply